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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 183-187

Passive radium measurements in soil samples from North Western desert of Egypt using LR-115 nuclear track detector


Department of Security Sciences, Nuclear Security Program, Naif Arab University for Security Sciences, Riyadh, KSA; Department of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ahmed Saad Hussein
Department of Security Sciences, Nuclear Security Program, Naif Arab University for Security Sciences, Riyadh; Department of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, Cairo

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrcr.jrcr_47_20

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Background: The knowledge of the distribution of radionuclides and radiation levels in the environment is important for assessing the effects of radiation exposure to human beings. Radium (226Ra) and its ultimate precursor uranium (238U) are the parent sources of radon (222Rn).222Rn is the main natural radiation source of exposure of human beings and has been recognized as a carcinogenic gas. Measurement of radon and radium in soil samples is useful in studying the health risks. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the radium content in soil samples from northwestern desert of Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 soil samples were collected from four regions named El-Alamin, El-Dabaa, Marsa Matrouh, and El-Negala cities in northwestern desert of Egypt. The radium contents in soil samples were estimated by sealed cup technique using LR-115 nuclear track detectors. Results: Radium concentration has been found to vary from 11.58 to 29.11 Bq/kg with an average value of 20.63 ± 1.46 Bq/kg. Conclusion: The observed values of radium concentration in all soil samples are less than the permissible value of 370 Bq/kg recommended by the UNSCEAR 2000 and OCED 1979. Hence, the result shows that these areas under study are safe as far as the health hazard effects of radium are concerned.


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